Search for tag: "b."

Adding rational expressions with common denominators & GCF factoring

An example that is easy to combine with subtraction, in this case, because the two fractions have common denominators. However, be aware that there may be a way to simplifying the answer further. …

From  Tom Grant 6 plays 0  

Dividing rational expressions involving multivariate monomials

A quick justification of dividing fractions by multiplying by the reciprocal of the second fraction in the division followed by an example that involves reducing the common factors in the numerator…

From  Tom Grant 5 plays 0  

Quotient rule with negative exponents: Problem type 2

A multi-variable fraction that is reduced by applying the quotient rule and the definition of a negative exponent.

From  Tom Grant 4 plays 0  

Solving a word problem involving a sum and another basic relationship using a system of lineaer equations

This demo discusses how to set up two equations to solve the situation described, and then choose the best method to use to solve for each of the variables.

From  Tom Grant 10 plays 0  

Writing an equation in slope-intercept form given the slope and a point

This shows the method of using the point-slope form to write the equation, then solving that form for y to get y = mx + b.

From  Tom Grant 21 plays 0  

Writing an equation and graphing a line given its slope and y-intercept

The informaton given here can be entered directly into the y = mx + b or slope-intercept form. Then the y-intercept is used as a starting point where you apply rise over run to the given slope to…

From  Tom Grant 6 plays 0  

Finding the maximum or minimum of a quadratic function

This shows how to decide whether you are seeking a maximum or minimum value for a quadratic function and then how to find the vertex of i ts parabola to deternine the x-value that locates the min…

From  Tom Grant 11 plays 0  

Solving for a variable in terms of other variables in a rational equation: Problem type 3

This one demonstrates how to eliminate the rational parts of the equation as usual, then gather the terms with the chosen variable on one side of the equal sign so that it can be factored to one…

From  Tom Grant 18 plays 0  

Adding rational expressions with denominators ax - b and b - ax

Describes how to deal with denominators that are simply opposite in sign when adding or subtracting fractional expressions.

From  Tom Grant 23 plays 0  

Pythagorean Theorem

A quick run through the use of a^2 + b^2 = c^2 to find an unknown side of a right tirangle if we know the other two sides.

From  Tom Grant 14 plays 0  

Multiplying conjugate binomials: Univariate

Demonstrates what happens when the F.O.I.L. method is applied to multiply two binomails of the form (a + b) (a - b). It's special circumstance that allows a short cut.

From  Tom Grant 32 plays 0  

Solving a word problem using a system of linear equations of the form Ax + By = C

Talks about how to interpret the words to create two equations, then solves them together using the elimination method, making opposites of one variable's terms sot that the equations can be…

From  Tom Grant 19 plays 0  

Classifying systems of linear equations from graphs

Looks at the three types of graphs that can occur with a system of two linear equaltions in two variables.

From  Tom Grant 17 plays 0  

Identifying solutions to a system of linear equations

This demonstrates testing possible answers to a system of two equations to see whether they are truly answers or not. Note that each answer has to work for both equations, but if it doesn't…

From  Tom Grant 14 plays 0  

Graphing a function of the form f (x) = ax + b: Fractional slope

Shows how thits form is simply the same as y = mx + b, and then writes the slope and y-intercpt down. It ends with using these to graph the line of points that satisfy this function.

From  Tom Grant 99 plays 0  

Finding slopes of lines parallel and perpendicular to a line given in the form Ax + By = C

Shows how to convert Ax + By = C to y = mx + b then what and why the slopes for parallell and perpendicular lintes are what they are.

From  Tom Grant 20 plays 0